Childhood maltreatment tied to later cardiovascular disease

Lifestyle

All types of childhood maltreatment are associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in both men and women, according to a study published online July 13 in Heart.

Ana Luiza Gonçalves Soares, Ph.D., from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, and colleagues evaluated associations between childhood maltreatment and cardiovascular outcomes (CVD, hypertensive disease, ischemic heart disease [IHD], and cerebrovascular disease) among 157,311 participants from the U.K. Biobank.

The researchers found that all types of maltreatment were associated with an increased risk for CVD and IHD in both sexes. Among women, all types of maltreatment were associated with a higher risk for hypertensive disease, and all maltreatment, except emotional neglect, was associated with cerebrovascular disease. Among men, all maltreatment, except sexual abuse, was associated with a higher risk for hypertensive disease, and all maltreatment, except physical and sexual abuse, was associated with cerebrovascular disease. Stronger associations were seen among women. Individuals who were younger at baseline had stronger associations of childhood maltreatment with any CVD and IHD.

“Individuals who suffered maltreatment in childhood have higher risk of CVD, especially women, and might benefit from early screening and interventions to prevent cardiovascular consequences,” the authors write.